Make or Model

Discuss antique/relic firearms, historic firearms and collections here.
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ARMARIN

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#1

Post by ARMARIN » Wed Apr 03, 2019 2:32 am

Make or Model

Just like a car, the make or model of the firearm you purchase is a determining factor on how much it is actually worth. A Winchester or Colt firearm is most likely going to be valued higher than similar style antique guns. This is mainly due to historic relevance and brand name appeal. Winchester and Colt made many firearms that are now considered antique guns and their names are famous in the collecting community. Some gun enthusiasts prefer to have one or two makes or models of firearms, but you can build your firearm collection anyway you choose. You can specify what kinds of guns you like by era, war, or even country. Find a gun you think is interesting or unique and start out by collecting one or two of that variety. This will give you a focus to start your collection off and you can continue to buy more from there.

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ARMARIN


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jimg11

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#2

Post by jimg11 » Sun Aug 16, 2020 5:10 pm

The name antique keeps being longer in the past according to the BATF (1898) I prefer VINTAGE Fire arms which are models that are no longer made. My Remington 141 made in 1937 is a good example. The slide / pump action and the .35 Remington makes a nice deer gun that is so precisely made that can be taken down into 2 pieces. I have put modern sights on mine but have all the parts to bring it back to original. I do not think that I would want to fire a per 1898 Antique.

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Added in 12 minutes 32 seconds later:
Another example is a revolver that left the S&W factory in January 1917 is this Heavy Frame Target (22/32) in 22 long rifle. It was made before we got into WW1.

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Added in 9 minutes 22 seconds later:
This Smith & Wesson model 1 1/2 32S&W caliber revolver is considered to be an antique by the BATF as it left Smith & Wesson in July 1887,

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Firearms Safety is No Accident. Jim

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jimg11

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#3

Post by jimg11 » Fri Oct 02, 2020 10:10 am

Back around 1954 Colt decided to never make again their Single Action Army Revolver that had been made off and on since 1873 and was the revolver that according to some Was the Gun that had Won the West. A group of investors approached Colt and asked if Colt would have a problem with them manufacturing a copy of the Colt Single Action Army Revolver. Colt even sold them what few SAA parts that had been around the Colt Factory. The New Manufacturer was Great Western Arms Company and soon was making a Colt SAA Copy. However grade B movies and Television were making More and More Cowboy shows and SAA revolvers were suddenly in great demand. Colt soon announced the reintroduction of The Single Action Army Revolver. Relatively new Strum Ruger started making their versions of the SAA. Great Western had hardly gotten started when they were having to compete with Colt and Ruger and European copies. The G W A Co. only lasted until 1964 but there is a nice piece of history. Below is a early Great Western .45 Colt Sherriff or Store Keeper model.

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Firearms Safety is No Accident. Jim

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#4

Post by jimg11 » Sun Oct 04, 2020 4:27 pm

One of the problems that I have is that while I have had many antique firearms over the years I have had to sell or trade a large percentage of my collection as my family responsibilities are far more than my need to collect. Upon my retirement I needed get rid of my home mortgage so a lot of of my guns made a trip to the Auction House. I did alright but within a couple years the guns I sold were selling for a lot more than I got. I did of course pay off my Mortgage. Below is a picture of some of my guns long gone. The nickel plated DA .38 S&W revolver from around the turn of the century 1900. The Nickel Plated .32 S&W Safety Hammerless is near the same age.

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Added in 11 minutes 38 seconds later:
This Beautiful 5th model Safety Hammerless 38 S&W was the nicest I ever owned.

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Added in 8 minutes later:
This S&W model 696 44 Special was one that I do miss a lot. It had had a lot of custom work but I cannot have everything.

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Firearms Safety is No Accident. Jim

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#5

Post by jimg11 » Sun Oct 04, 2020 6:37 pm

The #1 Item that I really miss was my Model 52 .38 Special Auto Pistol.

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#6

Post by jimg11 » Sat Oct 17, 2020 8:09 pm

Another revolver that is over 100 years old but still not an antique by the BATF. A Smith & Wesson 1903 rev 2 32 S&W long. from 1907.

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Firearms Safety is No Accident. Jim

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